Ultra Micro MOOC

This week I had the opportunity to create any massive open online course or MOOC of my choice.  Here is my idea.

In my Valuable Volleyball course my peers will master basic volleyball skills by practicing then creating a video project while utilizing the class discussion board.

1. Course Topic: Volleyball
2. Course Title & Photo:  Become a Valuable Volleyball Player
3. Who is coming to your course? What will attract them? Why would they want to participate in this experience?

The focus of this course to allow anyone that has ever wanted to play volleyball or had little experience playing to enhance basic skills and provide rules for play.  I would attract people by having the following in the course description.

You only live once so why not learn a skill you have been meaning to learn for some time now.  This interactive and collaborative learning course will have you completing the basic skills necessary to feel comfortable to begin playing on the court.  The best part is you can do so in the privacy of your own home if you chose.  The outline below shows the progression of the course.

I.  Introduction

A. Here you will get a chance to learn about myself, my passion for volleyball through play, being a referee and also a coach.

B. Students will post in the discussion their experience with volleyball, if any, why they decided to take the course as well as what they expect to gain from the experience.

C. Students will also be advised to read everyone else’s post and comment on two responses.

D. Students will be required to purchase a volleyball.  I will give instructions on how to tell what is a good volleyball, where they can buy one as well as how much they will cost.

E. Students will create a gmail account to have small group google hangouts.

II. Passing-Week 1

A. Students will be taught that this is the most important skill in volleyball and why through readings.

B. Students will watch a video, created by me, that demonstrates the proper way to pass a ball as well as common mistakes people make (ie bending their elbows, swinging their arms).

C. Homework-students will be required to pass the ball and work on having control both by passing against a wall and by passing to themselves.  Goal: Complete 50 passes without the ball dropping each day.  Turn in log via Googledoc of when you practice and short response of how you did each time.  I understand that there might be days where you cannot practice so shoot for practicing a total of two hours a week, however how you divide your time is up to you.

D. Small groups arrange a time as well as meet on google hangout to discuss difficulties and even watch each other to help perfect the skill.

III. Setting-Week 2

A. A brief description of setting will be taught through readings.

B. Students will watch a video that demonstrates the proper way to set a ball as well as common mistakes people make (ie not using fingertips, allowing the ball to spin).

C. Homework-students will be required to set the ball and work on having control both by setting against a wall and to themselves.  Goal: Complete 50 sets without the ball dropping each day. Continue the log of when you practice and short response of how you did each time.  Also, please continue to practice passing this week.

D. Small groups arrange a time as well as meet on google hangout to discuss difficulties and even watch each other to help perfect the skill.

IV. Hitting/Spiking-Week 3

A. A brief description of hitting will be taught through readings.

B. Students will watch a video that demonstrates the proper way to hit a ball as well as common mistakes people make (ie improper approach, holding your hand incorrectly).

C. Homework-since it is hard to hit properly without other players and a net, you will just be required to practice a spike approach and keep a log as well as watch an additional video on different players hitting the ball.

V. Serving(underhand and overhand)-Week 4

A. A brief description of serving will be taught through readings.

B. Students will watch a video that demonstrates the proper way to serve a ball as well as common mistakes people make (ie high toss, holding your hand high for underhand).

C. Homework-since it is hard to practice serving properly without a net, you will be required to watch an additional video on different players serving the ball.

VI. Rules-Week 5

A. This week basic rules will be given via readings.

B. To test your knowledge of these rules take the interactive quiz, using prongo, complete with videos and matching cards.

VII. Project-Week 6

A. Complete a video of what you have learned so far in the course that demonstrates the skills you have acquired.  You may do so using any software you are comfortable using.  I will give instructions on how to create a video if you have never completed one before. A rubric will be given also.

VIII. Online Exam-Week 7

4. What do you want learners to be able to do when they are done? (Connect your thoughts here to the learning theories you explored last week and the design principles you learned this week.) How long is your course experience?

Due to the fact that students are presented information, they get the chance to try to apply it and then reflect on it I am using the experiential learning theory in this class.  The reason I chose this method is because it has always worked well in my coaching experience when I am right in front of the students.  The only difference is they have to watch my video and not be allowed to practice in front of me.

This week we have been learning about instructional design.   It is the entire process of analysis of learning needs and goals and the development of a delivery system to meet those needs (Siemens, 2002).  The design I created facilitates learning using an instructional design plan by the using the following components.  The problem; not knowing how to play volleyball, instructional objective; learning a new skill each week and practicing that skill, essential content: logs and group chats, evaluation: logs and creation of the video and the final exam, and methods: videos, readings and group chats.

Also, the backwards design approach by Wiggins and McTighe helped me to formulate the design of the course by starting with my desired results, which is to help people interested in playing volleyball understand the basics skills necessary to play.  Next, the progression of the course required students to give feedback and evidence of practicing the skills. Last, the students create a video in which they show how much they have learned.

5. What will peers make?

Above you can see that students will create their own videos to demonstrate their learning of the basic skills.

6. Now that you’ve identified skills and made projects for each skill, how do those activities hang together as a course? (Again, connect to learning theories, instructional design and consider how TPACK comes into play.)

The google hangouts really allow the students to connect with their peers and learn from each other and possibly catch errors that one might not realize they are making.  This will really help them progress the skill as well as reflect on how they are doing. The course log via googledoc holds students accountable for completing practices but more importantly is that reflection piece of the experiential learning theory that really tells me how they think they are doing.  The integration of technology into the course is so incredibly relevant to create an interactive course.  Without it, it would just be reading and responding which not only makes for a boring class, but doesn’t ensure progression of the skills except in writing.

7. How will peers help each other in your course?

Answered in question 6.

References:

Prongo. (n.d.). Quiz Station. Retrieved July 27, 2013, from http://www.prongo.com/quizstation/

Siemens, G. (2002). Instructional Design in ELearning, from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/InstructionalDesign.htm

Volleytastic. (n.d.). Volleyball Rules. Retrieved July 27, 2013, from http://www.volleytastic.com/playing-volleyball/basic-volleyball-rules/

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design, Expanded 2nd Edition.  Prentice Hall.  pg 13-33.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s