Final Reflection

Throughout the class CEP 811 at Michigan State University I have learned so many things and more importantly changed my mind set.  The importance of guiding my students to express their creativity has always been present.  However, I did not think about the importance of them becoming makers.

This generation of students has had so much more experience with technology than earlier generations did.  Until now, I always saw technology as a way to enhance the curriculum.  I now know that we can use technology to show students that they can be makers and that anything is possible.  What an amazing skill to empower my students with.

Although using the maker kits became more difficult for me to relate to my high school mathematics classroom, I would still like to try to integrate them somehow.  At this time, I feel like I could see the makey makey working better in an elementary or specials classroom.

The quote from the MAET program states “As adult learners, we are most interested in your growth – and you will be evaluated on the basis of how far you go, not on the basis of where you started.”  As I re-read this, I thought what a great way to assess.  Progress should be measured, not so much right or wrong.  Students, including myself, all learn at a different pace and in different ways.  My favorite way to describe this is by comparing student learning to a doctor prescribing a drug, no one prescription works for every patient just as no one way of teaching works for all students.  If I were to evaluate my own growth after taking this course I would say I learned a lot.  The learning theories helped me to figure out how much education has evolved as well as the different theories that I have a tendency to teach more often than others.  Whether I am telling students to memorize their fast facts, which is the cognitivism approach, or using an exploratory approach and letting them discover they are computing surface area understanding how my students learn best is key.

The biggest afterthought of the course became from me reflecting on my favorite assignments.  I really enjoyed creating my ultra micro massive open online course.  Although I had no experience with a MOOC before it became a real fun task to create my own.  It allowed for me to feel good about what I know and do pretty good, which is play and coach volleyball.  Creating this MOOC was fun and I thought about presenting the idea to my students and asking them what type of course they would teach or create if they could to get to know them a little better at the beginning of the school year.  I also reflected on enjoying coming up with ideas and creating my maker experiment.  Although I struggled with integrating into a math context I had fun trying to come up with ideas.  I even involved my family for brainstorming.  I firmly believe that my reflection of these two assignments taught me that I enjoy being able to be creative just as much as my students do and I really need to stress the importance of that in my classroom.

I plan to implement as much as I can to allow my students to be creative and innovative.  This class has taught me that that is what my students need and want in my quest to make them the best that they can be for their future endeavors.  For that I say thank you Bill and Missy.

Choose Your Own Adventure (SoTL)

This week I learned about the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).  SoTL is using effective teaching methods in the classroom but take it a step further to involve inquiry into teaching, engagement, feedback, and reflection on teaching and learning. The Scholarship of Teaching and learning also stresses the importance of sharing results so others can review, critique and build on the work.  In the past, teaching has been a closed door policy.  We often imagine teaching as individualistic and self-directed, a sequestered event to which students are the only witnesses, and in which the professor is the only teacher(Bender, 1999). We cannot grow and become better teachers if we continue on that pathway.

Next we were asked to take that information learned about SoTL and find research based resources for my professional contexts which would be mathematics.  I decided to look for resources pertaining to hands on mathematics and/or research on lessons using technology in mathematics.  I was fortunate to be able to chat with a MSU librarian via instant message.  Within a minute the librarian was responding to my question.  The librarian then asked if it was teaching related and for what grade levels would I prefer.  Shortly after answering the librarian had a great resource for me.

1.  Hands-on Mathematics + Multicultural Education = Student Success.  

This article discusses how math teaching was approached differently in one particular example. It showed how a class of multi-racial students was able to learn basic math concepts by instituting different hands on ways to apply math. Some of the ways they did this was by showing fractionally how basketball is divided by different skill levels among caucasian and african american players as well as female players. The students actually guessed as to how their own class would do with basic basketball skills and made “hand-made” wooden hoops to show the results. Another interesting concept was that at the beginning of the class, at the start of the semester, the teachers and students made a “deal” and shook hands on it. The teachers promised to make math apply to the “real world” and to make math fun if the student agreed to learn and give 100% effort. It was an interesting article to research.

2.  The second link he sent me was an article titled Hands-On Mathematics and Science Activities for Students in Grades K-8: A Guide for Teachers, Tutors, and Parents.  Unfortunately, ERIC did not have a PDF available and the librarian mentioned that it is probably on microfiche.  He also said that it might be available at a later date in PDF format.

3. The Effects of Teaching Techniques and Teacher Attitudes on Math Anxiety in Secondary Level Students.  This Article described an experiment which revolved around a class of 48 students learning algebra I. Half of these students were taught in a “regular” style by a math teacher using her typical and standard method of teaching algebra I. The other half of students were in a environment where the idea of stress due to math was addressed. The teaching approach in this class was to try an eliminate any anxiety about learning and doing math. Additional teachers were used and a different approach to instruction was instituted. Despite one class focusing on the anxiety and “stress” level of students, the learning results were almost identical between the two classes. Even with focusing on “math anxiety”, it did not change the level of learning in the classroom when compared to a class that did not address this issue.

4. An Ap”peel”ing Activity.  This was an actual activity that was allowed to be peer reviewed.  To explore surface area and volume of a sphere students peel an orange and make inferences before and after peeling.  I might actually use something similar in my Geometry classroom.

5. Partnership Teaching: Success for All Children Using Math as a Vehicle.  This article stressed the importance of accepting others ideas and thoughts and working together in groups as a team.  It had provided some great ideas for activities that I could use in my sixth grade mathematics classroom.  Unfortunately some of the activities would need to be scaffolded toward a middle school learner as opposed to elementary.

I really liked the librarian feature.  The librarian was so helpful but did all the leg work for me.  I was almost hoping they would show me how to look up things and have it be more interactive.  It showed me how easy it is to find peer reviewed articles like was SoTL was referring to.  The librarian pointed out that most of the articles he was finding were before the year 2000, which I thought was interesting.

References:

Adeeb, P. and Bosnick, J. (1995). Hands-on Mathematics + Multicultural Education = Student Success. Retrieved on August 15, 2013 from http://www.edchange.org/multicultural/papers/math.html

Adeeb, P. and Bosnick, J. (1998). Partnership Teaching: Success for All Children Using Math as a Vehicle. Retrieved on August 15, 2013 from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ574661

Bender, E and Gray, D. (1999). The Scholarship of Teaching. Research & Creative Activity, XXII(1). http://www.indiana.edu/~rcapub/v22n1/p03.html

Quality Education for Minorities Network. (2000). Hands-On Mathematics and Science Activities for Students in Grades K-8 [electronic resource] : A Guide for Teachers, Tutors, and Parents. Retrieved on August 15, 2013 from http://catalog.lib.msu.edu/record=b6583593~S39a

Urich, J. A., & Sasse, E. A. (2011). An Ap”peel”ing Activity. Mathematics Teacher, 105(3), 189-193.

White, P. (1997). The Effects of Teaching Techniques and Teacher Attitudes on Math Anxiety in Secondary Level Students. Retrieved on August 15, 2013 from  http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED411151

Maker Experiment #2 (Universal Design)

This week we learned about the Universal Design for Learning (UDL).  This design was made to assist educators to reach all students in the learning process.  UDL helps educators meet this goal by providing a framework for understanding how to create curricula that meets the needs of all learners from the start (Cast, 2011).  After learning and working through how UDL works, I decided I needed to make a lot of revisions to my Maker Experiment to essentially reach more learners.

The changes necessary include a lot of integrating multiple representations and pathways to engage different backgrounds, abilities and motivations.  The point of the lesson is to review multiplication and division from the previous year so that the students can review and become faster in order to build on that knowledge in sixth grade, for example multiply and dividing integers and fractions.

  • To clarify syntax and structure, I would do a walk through of how to multiply and divide.
  • To reach auditory learners, a student would demonstrate how in English as well as Spanish due to the fact that I have a lot of ESL learners.
  • To reach visual learners, the students to watch this video called Long Division Style (Warning: you will not be able to get this out of your head).

The reviewing process would apply to more learners in the classroom due to the multiple representations offered.

To introduce the makey makey the first part of the lesson would contain the math basketball game.  Here two players can compete where a mouse and a left click button would be necessary.  I would create the mouse with a toy mouse of some sort connected to the makey makey and for the left click, a basketball would signal when the shot would be released from the players hands.  This would use touch equivalents for key visuals that represent concepts.

Next, students get into groups of three or four and let them know that they can either work together or take turns with the task.  Next, I will have them go to mangahigh.com.  A recent study showed that the work environment requires graduates to have skills to work collaboratively over distance and time (Kohut & Yon, 2013).  I would then have them find a game to play from that website and also create a game pad using the makey makey.  Providing options of the game to choose would allow some freedom, although I would have to regulate that they are not choosing a game that is too easy for them.  This would allow for them to practice basic mental math skills.

Each game played on mangahigh requires the use of the numbers 1-9 and an enter key much like the figure below.  Therefore, I would have them create a game board that they can step on much like the dance games that are popular now.  For connectivity to work, students would have to shade in the numbers with their pencil and connect each number to the makey makey as well as create an enter key with an object of their choice to allow customizing the display of the information.  Once it is connected correctly students may begin reviewing the concepts by playing the games all while using kinesthetic learning to step on the corresponding number answers.  Research shows that students reacted positively to the exercise and showed an improvement on their scores at both assessment periods (Melander & Wortmann, 2013).  Through this review students can relearn the math facts that they forgot as well as have fun playing.

Through learning about Universal Design for Learning, I was able to improve my lesson to essentially reach more learners.  UDL really helped me learn how to insert additions into my lessons to optimize levels of support.

References:

CAST (2011). Universal Design for Learning Guidelines version 2.0. Wakefield, MA: Author.

Kohut, G. F. & Yon, M. G. (2013). Student Perceptions of Cognitive and Social Learning in Global Virtual Teams: A Pilot Study. The Journal of Effective Teaching, 13(1), 19-32.

Long Division Style (2012). Retrieved on August 9, 2013 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWU6K3GV2A8.

Melander, L. A., & Wortmann, S. L. (2011). Activating Theory in the Introductory Classroom: Erving Goffman Visits Wisteria Lane. The Journal of Effective Teaching, 11(2), 75-86.

SUDOKU (n.d.) Retrieved on August 9, 2013 from http://juegos-inusuales.blogspot.com/.

21st Century Learning Space

Through learning about experience design, I believe that majority of educational facilities are doing students a disservice.  Learning should not be forced or seem like punishment, learning should be an aspiration.  Learning does begin that way, yet the way our education system has developed over time we have discouraged this.  Therefore, this week’s assignment on designing a 21st century learning space was very exciting to me, although creating the space using Google SketchUp made it a little more difficult.

SketchUp is an amazing tool that really allows the user to experience being an architect.  However, the learning space I had pictured in my head became so much more difficult to make than what I thought.  My first difficulty was creating the walls.  I was able to create a cube for my classroom, but was hoping to make transparent walls on two of the sides in order to peer inside.  Instead, I had to create the floor and two walls.  I also wanted a space with windows where students could sit in the sill for inspiration.  That is how this design was derived. Image

In playing more, I found hexagonal shapes and recreated the window space.  Ultimately, I would love to create my space so that it is environmental friendly and with as much recycled material as possible since I work at an environmental school.  I do have a growing passion for going being eco-friendly although I am still educating myself on the topic.

Technology is also a massive part of our students future.  Therefore, I created a space in which there are enough computers for each student.  The picture below shows laptops, however my ideal class would have tablets built into the desk tops so that students could use their desk tops with paper as well as for their tablets.

Image

Hence, I would have adjusted the tables to look a little more like this. In addition, I would have chosen more comfortable chairs more like teacher chairs so that the students could be comfortable as well as swivel to promote movement and keep the brain alert.

Furthermore, I changed the colors of the walls to match eco-friendly colors.  An independent study demonstrating white and off-white business environments resulted in a 25% or more drop in human efficiency (Faber, 1997).  Yet, most classrooms still have white and off white walls.  Cool colors are recommended for upper grade and secondary classrooms for their ability to focus concentration (Mahnke, 1996) .

My ultimate goal was to create a space where everyone can comfortably feel like a designer to allow their creativity to become enhanced.  To adapt to different learning styles, especially kinesthetic learners I added tablets on the walls for students who have trouble sitting still as well as embedded into the blue carpet space.  This, in turn, would allow learners can figure out where they are comfortable and most productive.  Although, as you can see, I had trouble rotating the tablets so that they lie flat on the wall.  Last, I added white boards for student use so that they can brainstorm and use as well as plants in the room to promote air purification and a homey feel.  You should also note that there is no teacher desk.  I have a teacher desk and I have yet to sit at it.  I am typically walking around or sitting with a student or small group.  My desk has become more of a storage place which could be eliminated by adding a storage cabinet.

Image

In closing, I am proud of the space I created.  A lot of my inspiration came from the 79 ways you can use design to transform teaching + learning.  I am sure this would be very expensive to create.  A tablet alone could cost anywhere from $200 to $1,000 and I have 19 pictured in my classroom.  Not to mention the high ceilings and windows.  The point is we are talking about creating a better future by developing life long learners.  Therefore, shouldn’t this investment be the opportunity of a lifetime?

References:

Birren, Faber. The Power of Color. Carol Publishing Group, New Jersey, 1997

iDesk Apple Desk (n.d.). Retrieved August 1, 2013, from
http://www.­furniii.­com/­2012/­04/­idesk-­apple-­desk-­design-­by-­sebastian-­lara/

Mahnke, Frank H. Color, Environment, and Human Response: An Interdisciplinary Understanding of Color and Its Use as a Beneficial Element in the Design of the Architectural Environment. New York: Wiley, 1996. Print.

The Third Teacher Plus. Online Website. Retrieved August 1, 2013, from http://thethirdteacherplus.com/s/79-Ideas-Overall-List.pdf. 

Ultra Micro MOOC

This week I had the opportunity to create any massive open online course or MOOC of my choice.  Here is my idea.

In my Valuable Volleyball course my peers will master basic volleyball skills by practicing then creating a video project while utilizing the class discussion board.

1. Course Topic: Volleyball
2. Course Title & Photo:  Become a Valuable Volleyball Player
3. Who is coming to your course? What will attract them? Why would they want to participate in this experience?

The focus of this course to allow anyone that has ever wanted to play volleyball or had little experience playing to enhance basic skills and provide rules for play.  I would attract people by having the following in the course description.

You only live once so why not learn a skill you have been meaning to learn for some time now.  This interactive and collaborative learning course will have you completing the basic skills necessary to feel comfortable to begin playing on the court.  The best part is you can do so in the privacy of your own home if you chose.  The outline below shows the progression of the course.

I.  Introduction

A. Here you will get a chance to learn about myself, my passion for volleyball through play, being a referee and also a coach.

B. Students will post in the discussion their experience with volleyball, if any, why they decided to take the course as well as what they expect to gain from the experience.

C. Students will also be advised to read everyone else’s post and comment on two responses.

D. Students will be required to purchase a volleyball.  I will give instructions on how to tell what is a good volleyball, where they can buy one as well as how much they will cost.

E. Students will create a gmail account to have small group google hangouts.

II. Passing-Week 1

A. Students will be taught that this is the most important skill in volleyball and why through readings.

B. Students will watch a video, created by me, that demonstrates the proper way to pass a ball as well as common mistakes people make (ie bending their elbows, swinging their arms).

C. Homework-students will be required to pass the ball and work on having control both by passing against a wall and by passing to themselves.  Goal: Complete 50 passes without the ball dropping each day.  Turn in log via Googledoc of when you practice and short response of how you did each time.  I understand that there might be days where you cannot practice so shoot for practicing a total of two hours a week, however how you divide your time is up to you.

D. Small groups arrange a time as well as meet on google hangout to discuss difficulties and even watch each other to help perfect the skill.

III. Setting-Week 2

A. A brief description of setting will be taught through readings.

B. Students will watch a video that demonstrates the proper way to set a ball as well as common mistakes people make (ie not using fingertips, allowing the ball to spin).

C. Homework-students will be required to set the ball and work on having control both by setting against a wall and to themselves.  Goal: Complete 50 sets without the ball dropping each day. Continue the log of when you practice and short response of how you did each time.  Also, please continue to practice passing this week.

D. Small groups arrange a time as well as meet on google hangout to discuss difficulties and even watch each other to help perfect the skill.

IV. Hitting/Spiking-Week 3

A. A brief description of hitting will be taught through readings.

B. Students will watch a video that demonstrates the proper way to hit a ball as well as common mistakes people make (ie improper approach, holding your hand incorrectly).

C. Homework-since it is hard to hit properly without other players and a net, you will just be required to practice a spike approach and keep a log as well as watch an additional video on different players hitting the ball.

V. Serving(underhand and overhand)-Week 4

A. A brief description of serving will be taught through readings.

B. Students will watch a video that demonstrates the proper way to serve a ball as well as common mistakes people make (ie high toss, holding your hand high for underhand).

C. Homework-since it is hard to practice serving properly without a net, you will be required to watch an additional video on different players serving the ball.

VI. Rules-Week 5

A. This week basic rules will be given via readings.

B. To test your knowledge of these rules take the interactive quiz, using prongo, complete with videos and matching cards.

VII. Project-Week 6

A. Complete a video of what you have learned so far in the course that demonstrates the skills you have acquired.  You may do so using any software you are comfortable using.  I will give instructions on how to create a video if you have never completed one before. A rubric will be given also.

VIII. Online Exam-Week 7

4. What do you want learners to be able to do when they are done? (Connect your thoughts here to the learning theories you explored last week and the design principles you learned this week.) How long is your course experience?

Due to the fact that students are presented information, they get the chance to try to apply it and then reflect on it I am using the experiential learning theory in this class.  The reason I chose this method is because it has always worked well in my coaching experience when I am right in front of the students.  The only difference is they have to watch my video and not be allowed to practice in front of me.

This week we have been learning about instructional design.   It is the entire process of analysis of learning needs and goals and the development of a delivery system to meet those needs (Siemens, 2002).  The design I created facilitates learning using an instructional design plan by the using the following components.  The problem; not knowing how to play volleyball, instructional objective; learning a new skill each week and practicing that skill, essential content: logs and group chats, evaluation: logs and creation of the video and the final exam, and methods: videos, readings and group chats.

Also, the backwards design approach by Wiggins and McTighe helped me to formulate the design of the course by starting with my desired results, which is to help people interested in playing volleyball understand the basics skills necessary to play.  Next, the progression of the course required students to give feedback and evidence of practicing the skills. Last, the students create a video in which they show how much they have learned.

5. What will peers make?

Above you can see that students will create their own videos to demonstrate their learning of the basic skills.

6. Now that you’ve identified skills and made projects for each skill, how do those activities hang together as a course? (Again, connect to learning theories, instructional design and consider how TPACK comes into play.)

The google hangouts really allow the students to connect with their peers and learn from each other and possibly catch errors that one might not realize they are making.  This will really help them progress the skill as well as reflect on how they are doing. The course log via googledoc holds students accountable for completing practices but more importantly is that reflection piece of the experiential learning theory that really tells me how they think they are doing.  The integration of technology into the course is so incredibly relevant to create an interactive course.  Without it, it would just be reading and responding which not only makes for a boring class, but doesn’t ensure progression of the skills except in writing.

7. How will peers help each other in your course?

Answered in question 6.

References:

Prongo. (n.d.). Quiz Station. Retrieved July 27, 2013, from http://www.prongo.com/quizstation/

Siemens, G. (2002). Instructional Design in ELearning, from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/InstructionalDesign.htm

Volleytastic. (n.d.). Volleyball Rules. Retrieved July 27, 2013, from http://www.volleytastic.com/playing-volleyball/basic-volleyball-rules/

Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design, Expanded 2nd Edition.  Prentice Hall.  pg 13-33.

 

Maker Experiment #1

Course: Math

Grade Level: 6th

Topic: Review of Basic Math Facts (+, -, x, ÷)

 

In order to integrate my makey makey into my classroom, I had to imagine how I could see this device enhancing learning for my students.  At first, I experienced difficulty in relating this to the topics and objectives taught in class.  Then ideas began coming to me.

My last blog post focused on centers for a kindergarten classroom because I had trouble relating it to my own class.  I then came up with the idea of making game centers in my classroom with the makey makey.  There are always fast facts and mental math concepts that I want my students to brush up on and master so that they do not struggle with new concepts that contain these elements.  Therefore, I have created this lesson to reinforce their mental math skills and promote scaffolding in the future.

To introduce the makey makey the first part of the lesson would contain the math basketball game.  Here two players can compete where a mouse and a left click button would be necessary.  I would create the mouse with a toy mouse of some sort connected to the makey makey and for the left click, a basketball would signal when the shot would be released from the players hands.

After demonstrating how this works and allowing the students to try, I would use a constructivism approach next.  The constructivism approach means to allow students to build on previous knowledge developed from past experiences.  Meaning, my sixth grade students come to me and they are supposed to be excellent at adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing.  Unfortunately, students always need to reinforce this skill, specially following summer break.  To enhance their previous skills, I would have my students get into groups of three or four and let them know that they can either work together or take turns with the task.  Next, I will have them go to mangahigh.com.  A recent study showed that the work environment requires graduates to have skills to work collaboratively over distance and time (Kohut & Yon, 2013) .  I would then have them find a game to play from that website and also create a game pad using the makey makey.  This would allow for them to practice basic mental math skills.

Each game played on mangahigh requires the use of the numbers 1-9 and an enter key much like the figure below.  Therefore, I would have them create a game board that they can step on much like the dance games that are popular now.  For connectivity to work, students would have to shade in the numbers with their pencil and connect each number to the makey makey as well as create an enter key with an object of their choice.  Once it is connected correctly students may begin reviewing the concepts by playing the games all while using kinesthetic learning to step on the corresponding number answers.  Research shows that students reacted positively to the exercise and showed an improvement on their scores at both assessment periods (Melander & Wortmann, 2013).  

Through this review students can relearn the math facts that they forgot as well as have fun playing.   Feel free to let me know what you think of this review activity.

 

References:

Constructivism. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constructivism_(learning_theory)
 

Kohut, G. F. & Yon, M. G. (2013). Student Perceptions of Cognitive and Social Learning in Global Virtual Teams: A Pilot Study. The Journal of Effective Teaching13(1), 19-32.

Melander, L. A., & Wortmann, S. L. (2011). Activating Theory in the Introductory Classroom: Erving Goffman Visits Wisteria Lane. The Journal of Effective Teaching11(2), 75-86.

Creating Centers with the Makey Makey Kit

My assignment this week was to explore my makey makey kit and come up with an idea of my own.  Through exploring, I watched a YouTube video where a boy and his dad create a robot costume.  This really helped open my eyes to new ideas.  After watching the video, Thinking Creatively: Teachers as Designers of Technology, Pedagogy & Content, I could not stop thinking about how to integrate this technology into the classroom.  This video shows how important it is to allow our students to be creative and use technology to build on the skills that we teach.  Our future depends on allowing our students to play and create new ideas that are novel, effective and whole (Mishra & Koerler, n.d.).  That is when my idea was derived.

My idea to integrate makey makey into the classroom seemed to fit for a pre-kindergarten or kindergarten classroom.  Although I teach middle and high school students, I could not figure out a way to integrate into my own classes yet.  My creation would consist of five centers in the classroom, each containing a makey makey kit.  The centers five centers I chose are listed in the diagram below.

Image

Center 1: Rhyming-This center would have objects attached to the makey makey kit that would say the name of the object when touched.  For example the six items at the table could be a cat, dog, bat, spoon, log, and a moon.  My idea stemmed from my findings at a thrift shop that had a ceramic cat and a stuffed dog. Students at this center could place the rhyming objects next to each other.  Potential problem: Having to move the objects would cause the wires to cross and tangle, also not sure if items picked could conduct electricity (although I am sure there is probably a way to ensure it).

Center 2: Music-This center I though would be a great start to playing music.  I really liked the piano idea on the makey makey website.  Therefore I would take a simple song like Mary had a Little Lamb (since it has only 4 chords) and connect the makey makey to four colors using colored pencil.  I would then have a play sheet that the students would have to follow but I would change the colors of the notes.  For example:  The red color when pressed would match to the first cord in the song and the yellow to the second and so forth.  Potential problem: This could be a complicated process for that age and might have to be modeled first and the students might just end up playing the music not the actual song, but that is still exploring.

Center 3: Shapes-This center would just have objects that attached to the makey makey that would say their names when touched.  For example: a box would say rectangular prism when touched and a 4×6 picture would say rectangle. Potential problem: Once again the connectivity of the object chosen.

Center 4: Counting-This center would be where the use of four different types of fruit connected would be fun.  For example: If a student touches the banana a recording would count to ten and then say you try.  If you touch the apple the recording would count to ten by two’s to introduce/reinforce skip counting and then say your turn.  An orange touched might skip count by fives.  Potential Problem: If there are multiple students working at this center and they are all touching a fruit they might not be able to hear well or repeat the counting.  However, if students are told that they have to take turns and one person must select a fruit at a time and they all repeat the information it could remove this problem.

Center 5: Animals- This center could be done in a few different ways.  Students could have animal objects connected so that when they touch the animal a recording would say the name of the animal and also the sound it makes.  It could even state what type of food the animal eats or where it lives.  Potential problem: Once again this would have to be a take turn center or else there would be a lot going on at once.

I hope you enjoyed my creation of centers using the makey makey kit.  While trying to think of a creation I tried to think of how I could relate it to a classroom.  I am very proud of what I have thought up.  Please leave comments on how you might change this so that it would work a little better.  Thanks for viewing.

References:

Koehler & Mishra (2008) Howitz, S.  Teaching Creatively: Teachers as Designers of Technology, Content and Pedagogy.  [Video file], Retrieved from Vimeo http://vimeo.com/39539571

Little Tikes Music Sheet [Online Image].  (2013) Retrieved on July 8, 2013 from http://www.littletikes.com/kids-toys/Mary-Had-A-Little-Lamb.html

Scuba Pupp. Robot Halloween Costume [Video File]. (2012) Retrieved on July 8, 2013 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbcO5lvFu88